Next Generation of Antioxidant

 
 
CyanthOx™ Sea Buckthorn Proanthocyanidins Logo
 
 

What is CyanthOx™?

CyanthOx™ is extracted from an ancient plant grown in Tibetan Plateau called sea buckthorn. Through billion years of evolution, sea buckthorn is a treasure of bioactive nutrients. CyanthOx™ water-soluble extract is a unique and rich combination of polyphenols, proanthocyanidins, bioflavonoids, which offer extensive natural health benefits.

 
 

Extraction Ratio

CyanthOx™ is obtained from sea buckthorn by using Patented Extraction Technology. It takes 300kg of sea buckthorn to produce 1kg of CyanthOx™.

CyanthOx™ has an extraction ratio of 300:1.
 
 

Composition

Shown by the HPLC on the right, the main flavonoids found in CyanthOx™ are:

  • Quercetin

  • Kaempferol

  • Isorhamnetin

High Performance Liquid Chromatogram(HPLC) of CyanthOx™

High Performance Liquid Chromatogram(HPLC) of CyanthOx™

 
 

ORAC Comparison

ORAC (μmol TE/100g)

As a result of its rich antioxidant profile, CyanthOx™ is very potent in terms of antioxidant capability.

According to Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) analysis*, CyanthOx™ has an ORAC value of 895,281 μmol TE/100g (Puredia Corporation Limited, 2019).

In comparison, CyanthOx™ is 8 times stronger than grape seed extract (Superfoodly.com, 2019) and 1.7 times more potent french maritime pine bark extract (Legault et al., 2013).

*a method of measuring antioxidant capacities in biological samples

 

CyanthOx™ is 1.7 Times Stronger than French Pine Bark Extract

ORAC Comparison  |  Tested by eurofins

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 Mechanism of Action

CyanthOx™ Sea Buckthorn Proanthocyanidins contributes to anti-inflammation by suppressing the NF-kB pathway, inhibiting the MAPK pathway, and activating Nrf2. These anti-inflammatory pathways inhibit COX-2 activity and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6) production.
  1. NF-kB Pathway leads to cell death and inflammation.

  2. MAPK Pathway leads to cell death, inflammation and tissue remodeling.

  3. Nrf2 Pathway facilitates the expression of the cell-protective gene in response to oxidative stress and inhibits inflammation enzymes and cytokines.

 
 

Clinical Trial

A clinical study recently published in Clinical Interventions in Aging shows that CyanthOx™30 can stimulate 3 different types of stem cell, contributing to anti-aging, anti-inflammation, skin health, vessel health and blood circulation.

 

Design: Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross-over trial was conducted in 12 participants for 2 hours.

Dosage: 500mg CyanthOx™30 per day

Result: Consumption of sea buckthorn proanthocyanidins leads to an increase in the following stem cells:

  • Progenitor stem cell

  • Endothelial stem cell

  • Mesenchymal stromal cell

Conclusion: 500mg CyanthOx™30 (150mg sea buckthorn proanthocyanidins) stimulates 3 different types of stem cell and supports preventive health, regenerative health, and postponing the aging process.

(Drapeau, Benson and Jensen, 2019)

 
 

Health Benefit

 
 

Antioxidation

Skin Care

Cardiovasulcar

Eyes and Vision

Gastrointestinal

 

Specification

CyanthOx™ Sea Buckthorn Proanthocyanidins Product Shot
  • Certified with the following:

CyanthOx™ Sea Buckthorn Proanthocyanidins Certifications (USDA Organic, EU Organic, Non-GMO, Halal, Kosher, NSF GMP, ISO9001, ISO14001, ISO22000, BRC certificate)

Recommended Daily Dosage: 500mg / 300mg / 187.5mg / 158mg per day

Shelf-Life: 3 years

 
 

Finished product is also available.

 

Technical Document

Product Brochure

Specification

CyanthOx™ Sea Buckthorn Proanthocyanidins Specification

Regulatory Information

CyanthOx™ Sea Buckthorn Proanthocyanidins Quality and Regulatory Information
 

Reference

  1. Puredia Corporation Limited. (2019). CyanthOx™80 ORAC Analytical Report. Available at: Here.

  2. Superfoodly.com. (2019). Antioxidant ORAC Value: Grape Seed Extract. [online] Available at: https://www.superfoodly.com/orac-value/grape-seed-extract/.

  3. Legault, J., Girard-Lalancette, K., Dufour, D. and Pichette, A. (2013). Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers. Antioxidants, [online] 2(3), pp.77-89. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4665433/.

  4. Drapeau, C., Benson, K. and Jensen, G. (2019). <p>Rapid and selective mobilization of specific stem cell types after consumption of a polyphenol-rich extract from sea buckthorn berries (<em>Hippophae</em>) in healthy human subjects</p>. Clinical Interventions in Aging, [online] Volume 14, pp.253-263. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368418/.

  5. Sugimura, R., Jha, D., Han, A., Soria-Valles, C., da Rocha, E., Lu, Y., Goettel, J., Serrao, E., Rowe, R., Malleshaiah, M., Wong, I., Sousa, P., Zhu, T., Ditadi, A., Keller, G., Engelman, A., Snapper, S., Doulatov, S. and Daley, G. (2017). Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells. Nature, [online] 545(7655), pp.432-438. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28514439.

  6. Yoder, M. (2017). Endothelial stem and progenitor cells (stem cells): (2017 Grover Conference Series). Pulmonary Circulation, [online] 8(1), p.204589321774395. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5731724/.

  7. Goldberg, A., Mitchell, K., Soans, J., Kim, L. and Zaidi, R. (2017). The use of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair and regeneration: a systematic review. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, [online] 12(1). Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28279182.

  8. Keating, A. (2006). Mesenchymal stromal cells. Current Opinion in Hematology, [online] 13(6), pp.419-425. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3365862/.